about one, have something

 Have some quality which makes one

A concise dictionary of English slang (2nd edition) . . 2015.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • have something on the brain — have (something) on the brain informal to not be able to stop thinking or talking about one particular thing. You ve got cars on the brain. Can t we talk about something else for a change? …   New idioms dictionary

  • something about one, to have —  To have mildly attractive orfascinating qualities …   A concise dictionary of English slang

  • To look about one — Look Look (l[oo^]k), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Looked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Looking}.] [OE. loken, AS. l[=o]cian; akin to G. lugen, OHG. luog[=e]n.] 1. To direct the eyes for the purpose of seeing something; to direct the eyes toward an object; to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • One Tree Hill (TV series) — One Tree Hill Intertitle, seasons 1–4; 8 Genre Drama, Sports Format Teen drama …   Wikipedia

  • one — [ wʌn ] function word *** One can be used in the following ways: as a number: We have only one child. How much does one pound of apples cost? as a determiner: He grew roses on one side of his garden, and vegetables on the other. We ll meet again… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • One Soldier — Steven Wright in One Soldier Directed by Steven Wright Starring …   Wikipedia

  • One Life to Live — Title card (2004–present) Genre Soap opera Created by Agnes Nixon …   Wikipedia

  • about — 1. as a preposition. In the meaning ‘roughly, approximately’ (eg. It took about ten minutes, about is the usual BrE word; around is also used, and is much more common in AmE. Round about is more informal, and is largely confined to BrE. 2.… …   Modern English usage

  • One Breath — The X Files episode Dana Scully s grave plate …   Wikipedia

  • have on the brain — have (something) on the brain informal to not be able to stop thinking or talking about one particular thing. You ve got cars on the brain. Can t we talk about something else for a change? …   New idioms dictionary


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